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Moving on from Homeschooling -- A Final Look at our Classroom

A couple of months ago, we received the most wonderful letter in the mail. Henry had won a lottery spot at a public Montessori school near our home. The school had been a struggling traditional elementary school that is converting to all Montessori starting last year. When we first heard about the switch we were elated but knew it was going to be tough to win a spot since, although it is close to our house, it is technically a different school district. With no Montessori options in our district, this was our only chance at Montessori through elementary school.  


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Thankfully, with the relative newness of the school they had funds available to open multiple Children's House level rooms (grades pre-K and kindergarten equivalents). And, with some luck Henry got a spot. So he will officially start at a Montessori school this fall and can stay there until 5th grade (or two years into upper elementary in Montessori terms). It also means that all of our children will have an automatic spot at this school for the future! 


Toddler {From Left to Right}: DIY ball drop; animal cards; object-to-picture matching; DIY size discrimination; color basket; sensory bottles; stick drop; open close basket; pom-pom drop


Geography: Continent globe; DIY Flag Maps; Watercolor Solar System cards; DIY continent map; United States Puzzle; Solar System mat; Space or Earth Cards; Labels for continent map; landmarks and animals for continent map; landform cards; continent boxes

But, with this awesome news comes some changes at home. Most notably, then end of homeschooling. We won't have {many} duplicate materials out at home so there is no need to have a classroom dedicated to Montessori materials anymore. So, in preparation for school, I'm slowly packing away materials and emptying out the room.


Sensorial: Dressing frames; pink tower, knobbed cylinders; knobbless cylinders; brown stairs, DIY weighted cylinders; pressure cylinders; color tablets; DIY smelling jars; sound matching


Language: Sandpaper double letters; pink series materials and language objects; sandpaper letters; toddler classification cards; more pink series work; sandpaper name; bird name matching; art appreciation cards


It's sad to move on from this beautiful space and I will miss our time together. But, I'm so excited for all the possibilities that lie ahead for him {and for the room!} He is going to be getting so much more from a school than I can give him here. I'm so grateful we live where we do and have Montessori options available. 


Corner Shelf: Fraction Skittles; constructive triangles; DIY language/object box 


Small Mixed: Metal Insets; DIY Living/Non-Living Basket; DIY rock clock; Lined Chalkboard; Movable Alphabet 


Math/Science: Discovery Boxes; Magnifying glass with basket of treasures {currently rocks}; Montessori botany puzzles; DIY teen boards; 1-9,000 number tablets; Addition/Subtraction numbers with symbols; bead stair; various golden beads 

For now, I'm planning on making this a space for Nora and Baby 3.0 to share. I'll be sure to update as we make this transition. Especially as we become a family with a child in a public Montessori elementary!

Comments

Best of luck with your new adventure in public school!
by Angeltots said…
Congratulations!! This is awesome news! :)

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