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Montessori Toddler Activities A to Z (Part 1)

I've been seeing a lot of A-Z guides around lately, and thought it might be fun to do a Montessori themed one. Instead of doing definitions, I decided I would do some Montessori friendly activities that matched with each letter. These are are just the first things that came to my mind for each letter, and is not meant to be an exhaustive list of potential Montessori friendly toys or activities.

Montessori friendly activities for toddlers A to Z!

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All ages are approximate, and will depend on your own individual child! 

A is for Apple washing (and cutting) 
  • You'll need: a bowl with some water, an apple, an apple slicer, cutting board, and serving plate.
  • To do: Wash the apple in the bowl, you can cut it horizontally (if necessary), and then have your toddler slice and serve.  
  • Ages: 14 months+ 
B is for Ball Tracker 
  • You'll need: a ball tracker of some sort! There are lots of tracking toy options. Look for one that is simple and child led, without noises or lights. 
  • To do: Simply demonstrate and allow your child to explore 
  • Ages: 12 months - 30 months. 
C is for Clay (and play dough) 
  • You'll need: some simple non-toxic clay/dough (I like this recipe without the food coloring), simple tools/rollers/cookie cutters, jar to store clay, basket for tools. 
  • To do: For younger child that is still mouthing clay/dough can be left in a jar to poke at with fingers or small sticks (like a popsicle stick). For an older children, you can show them how to remove it from jar and manipulate it. Introduce tools as your child seems interested. 
  • Ages: 12 months+
D is for Dropper Transferring
  • You’ll need: large or small dropper, two small bowls or containers for transferring, plastic tray, small sponge 
  • To do: Use a large dropper for younger children, and smaller as children get more proficient. Place containers on tray and show your toddler how to squeeze water from one bowl to the other. Wipe any spills with the sponge.
  • Ages: 24 months+
E is for Egg Peeling

  • You’ll need: hard boiled egg, small bowl, serving plate 
  • To do: Show your toddler how to crack the egg on the side of the small bowl, then peel, placing pieces into the bowl. When completed, serve and eat! To add some complexity, try an egg slicer. 
  • Ages: 15 months+ 

F is for Folding Laundry
  • You’ll need: smaller pieces of clean laundry (wash cloths and hand towels work well) 
  • To do: Slowly and carefully show your child how to fold item in half, and then in half again. Keep your language to a minimum so it doesn’t distract from your movement. 
  • Ages: 12 months+ 
G is for Glue Box
  • You’ll need: a glue box or similar divided tray, a small container of non-toxic glue, assorted paper shapes for gluing, brush, paper 
  • To do: place items for gluing in the box/tray along with brush and glue. Show your child how to use the brush to gently paint some glue to the paper and stick the assorted shape to the glue. 
  • Ages: 30 months+ 

H is for Horizontal Disks
  • You’ll need: Montessori horizontal dowel or similar DIY
  • To do: Slowly show your child how to place and remove rings. Allow for repetition and exploration. 
  • Ages: 12 - 18 months 
I is for Imbucare Box
  • You’ll need: a Montessori imbucare Box (triangle, rectangle) or similar DIY 
  • To do: Slowly show your child how to place shape in box and remove. Allow for repetition and exploration. 
  • Ages: 12 - 16 months
J is for Juicing
  • You’ll need: a cut in half fruit to juice (oranges or lemons work well), a small juicer, a small cup 
  • To do: Slice fruit in front of your child (or have an older child slice), place fruit on juicer and show your child how to squeeze and turn. Allow your child to explore. Then pour into cup. 
  • Ages: 18 months+ 
K is for Keys and Locks 
  • You’ll need: a small set of lock and key, an older child could use a lock box, or box with slot
  • To do: Slowly show your child how to work the lock, add coins for an older child who maybe ready for more. 
  • Ages: 18 months+
L is for Lacing Beads
  • You’ll need: a lacing bead set or similar DIY, a tray to organize, and small bowl for beads. Switch to smaller and smaller beads as your child masters (depending on your child's interest in continuing)
  • To do: Slowly show your child how to place beads on string, and remove. Allow for repetition and exploration. 
  • Ages: 18 months+ 
M is for Matching Work
  • You’ll need: matching objects or pictures to match. Younger children will enjoy more concrete objects to manipulate and older children will be comfortable with pictures/illustrations. Basket or tray to organize.
  • To do: Slowly remove objects or pictures from basket and start to match, using language to describe each picture/object as you remove it. Then start to match. Hand over to your child, allow for repetition and exploration. 
  • Ages: 14 months+ 
These are just some of the fun things that you can do around your home to engage your toddler!

READ PART 2 LETTERS N to Z HERE

Montessori friendly activities for toddlers A to Z!


Are any of these favorites for your toddler? Would you include a different activity for any of these letters? 
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