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Observing through Art with a Buddha Zen Scroll

Observation is such a critical skill for a Montessori parent. Yet, the ability to sit back and watch, really watch, your child is not an easy thing to do. There are so many distractions in modern life, so many pressures to push your children, and so many voices telling you what they should or should not being doing. It can be so easy to forget that your child already knows what he or she needs and is working to get there.

Observing artistic expression with a Buddha Zen Scroll. As a Montessori parent, it's important to take time to observe your child. This mess free painting set makes that easy.

One of my personal favorite things to observe is a children engaged in artistic expression. It's literally like getting a glimpse into their soul. You get to see how they see the world, you get insight into what drives them, what challenges them, what's funny to them, and so much more.


It's also a rare opportunity to watch their hands move. To see their strength in action. To observe changes in their physical growth that can otherwise be difficult to notice. Suddenly, your child is holding that brush so beautifully, is drawing straight lines, or is forming shapes and letters. Change is captured, right there for you to see.


Nora loves to create. So, I'm always keeping my eye out for things that can give her a creative outlet. Recently, I discovered this Buddha Zen Scroll. This scroll allows Nora to paint completely mess free with only water. As she paints, the scroll makes the water appear dark black, creating stunning and captivating images. Then, as the water evaporates, the images slowly fade away. It's reusable so once it's dry, the process can begin again and again. 

Observing artistic expression with a Buddha Zen Scroll. As a Montessori parent, it's important to take time to observe your child. This mess free painting set makes that easy.

3 Tips for Observing Artistic Expression

When observing artistic expression, I set a few rules for myself! First, I sit back and let her lead. This means, I don't make suggestions about what she should create, how she should do it, or when. That's completely up to her. Two, I only participate in her work if she invites me. This doesn't mean I won't be making my own art, but I don't assume she wants me to color or work with her materials. Three, I ask her questions instead of making assumptions about her work. I let her explain what she's making, why she's making it and how it makes her feel. I don't try to interpret it for her.


The Buddha Zen Scroll set has been the perfect way to observe Nora at work lately. It has been deeply engaging for both her and Henry. The smooth movements, the deep color, and slow pace of this material has sparked great concentration and joy. The set itself comes with everything that is needed for the work including the large brush, and water dish. The large working surface has been lovely for creating large scenes. Nora also likes to try and cover the entire thing with black before the first part starts to fade away. 


Plus, a bonus for me is that unlike other forms of painting, I don't have to worry about my carpet, or their clothes or tables being messy -- making this great even for younger toddlers. The scroll is easy to take out and roll back away. While some mess can lead to great practical opportunities, it's also nice to have some materials that I know can easily just be put back on the shelves! This lovely set can be purchased here

Observing artistic expression with a Buddha Zen Scroll. As a Montessori parent, it's important to take time to observe your child. This mess free painting set makes that easy.

Do you like to observe your child's creative process? How do you stop yourself from interfering? 

This post was sponsored. However, all opinions and thoughts are my own. 
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Comments

I love this! I'm saving it for when my little guy is old enough. I couldn't agree more with everything you said about observation and art as well - so important to let the child own the process, rather than giving them a "craft" that is supposed to turn out in a specific cute way to please adults. Love the look of concentration on your little one's face!
Ashlea said…
I immediately went and bought this after reading the post, thanks to amazon prime it was on my doorstep yesterday afternoon. Its suppose to rain here today so what a nice way to spend the afternoon introducing this to the kids! Thanks Nicole for the great find :)

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