Moving, Moving -- Montessori Baby Week 33

Augustus has been sick all week with a high fever, but that hasn't stopped him from doing the one thing he really wants to do -- move. Movement is such a huge part of his life these days. Some days it feels like all he does is roll from one end of the room to the other looking for any weaknesses in our baby proofing efforts. And, you know what? That's totally fine. It's actually more than fine, it's perfect. 


"One of the most thrilling achievements for a child is learning to move himself through space to get to a desired object." Susan Mayclin Stephenson 


It's hard in practice, but the freedom of movement is paramount to any of our own desires as parents. But, for me, this time it's been the most difficult to remember that this not only includes the freedom to move when and how he wants, but also the freedom to develop this movement at his own pace. I wanted to share this because I think in the Montessori and RIE online communities there is a tendency to see babies that are very capable, very fast movers.

These little babies that are climbing their Pikler Triangles, or cruising around the room, or walking. And, that's amazing! I even had a couple of babies like that. But, freedom of movement also means letting a baby develop slowly! Letting them take their time. It's about not rushing them. Not pushing for something beyond their natural capabilities. It's careful observation.

And, sitting back and letting a child develop at his/her own pace is such a gift! A gift I hope we can all give to our children. 


Augustus is definitely on the slower end of things because of his torticollis and low muscle tone. In his case, physical therapy has been necessary to help stretch his muscles. Is  his pace frustrating? I would be lying if I said it wasn't at times. But, the joy in his face when he has finally been able to push himself up with both hand, or reach my phone {lol, even non-screen time babies love them} has been irreplaceable.
"Through movement we come in contact with external reality, and it is through these contacts that we eventually acquire even abstract ideas." Maria Montessori 
So, whether you have a super mover, or if your baby wants to hang back a bit, celebrate it! Wait for your baby. Follow the child, know that they will get there on their own time!

Is your baby is fast mover? Or on a slower path? 



Comments

  1. Yes I have encountered the sense in some Montessori parents to be proud at how "early" their baby can do this or that. All that suggests to me is that conventional baby environments hinder babies but even developmentally normal Montessori babies can do some things on the "late" end. Both mine waited til 9 or 10 months to sit independently for example. I figure they just were busy working on some other less visible development. The physical milestones are so obvious but so many cognitive developments are going on too.

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  2. Your writing is very meaningful to first-time mothers like me. Hopefully you will have lots of more articles so that I can refer to my current and future parenting style.
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