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Montessori Toddler in the Kitchen at 3-years-old

With Nora being 3-years-old now, we are starting to leave the toddler years behind. This fall she will enter Children's House and a whole new world of discovery will open up for her. But, even at 3-years-old, and before entering school, she is so exceedingly capable. Kitchen tasks, in particular, are a favorite of hers. 

So, today I wanted to share a list of some of the things that a new 3-year-old, like Nora, could be doing in the kitchen. This list is by no means exhaustive. It is just a list of the things I can think of that Nora enjoys. Use it as inspiration, and remember to follow your own child's lead.  

50+ Montessori friendly ideas for getting your child involved in the kitchen.

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Food Preparation

Gathering necessary items for baking
Measuring out small amounts of food
Pouring and mixing pre-measured ingredients
Washing fruits and vegetables
Making tea or lemonade
Slicing fresh fruits and vegetables
Cracking an egg
Beating an egg
Making a sandwich
Following simple recipes with guidance


Make instant oatmeal
Use a toaster
Stir foods cooking on the stove
Make a mini pizza
Gather food from a toaster oven
Slice hard meats and cheeses
Pour a bowl of cereal
Mix dough
Use a rolling pin


Prepare a snack of dry food
Making a smoothie
Making a popsicle
Peal vegetables
Make instant pudding or jello
Juice an orange, lemon, or similar fruit
Bake or cook longer recipes with guidance

Cleaning

Wash hands
Wash the table
Put rags into laundry
Gather dirty dishes and place in sink/dishwasher
Spray child-safe cleaner
Wipe up spills
Bring things to garbage


Empty water buckets
Mop/sweep/swiffer the floor
Unload dishwasher and put away items with guidance
Replace wet dish towels
Wipe down counters
Wash dishes in the sink


Put away groceries
Hang up an apron
Fold kitchen towels and put them away
Scrub with a brush

Serving

Setting the table
Gathering water glasses for others
Pour water for herself
Scoop/transfer food to someone's plate
Bring someone food/drink to eat
Clearing the table

Other Skills

Walk with a knife
Put on an apron
Move around with a stool
Set glass down carefully, even in sink
Use oven mitts

Again, there is no way this is an exhaustive list of things that a new 3-year-old could be doing in the kitchen. If your child is interested in practical cooking, I urge you to make the time and space for your child to get involved, even from a very young age. 

50+ Montessori friendly ideas for getting your child involved in the kitchen.

Does your toddler like to work in the kitchen? What does your 3-year-old enjoy doing?

Comments

Charlotte said…
Where did you find oven mitts that fit Nora's hands ? All i can find are play oven mitts that offer no protection against heat ! We are working on "cracking an egg" at the moment, we still end up with lots and lots of eggshell in the batter if we're not careful enough but our son is so eager to learn ! It is one of my joys to cook with him =)
We have the oven mitts from curious chef! They are a tad big, but they aren't bad and really work!
Sofia Jones said…
This blog is really a nice blog for parents. All the kids should gain all the practical basic ideas about their study. With the practical knowledge, they start thinking in a different way. It builds up their curiosity to the top level. It means they will never pull their steps back by thinking that the new thing may not be that much interesting or would be a bit tough. I also ordered a very beautiful kitchen set from “Kidadvance Montessori” for my little daughter.

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