Skip to main content

Preparing for Winter with a Montessori Toddler

I don't know if you have ever noticed this, but the more you try to rush a toddler, the slower and slower they move. It's like a law of nature. Like, when you are trying to get out of the door for something.

Trying to get a toddler to be independent and learn new skills in these moments can be some of the most incredibly frustrating moments in parenthood. But, there are still times when you want your toddler to learn new skills and be as independent as possible. The trick I have found is to try to give these opportunities for independence outside of the stressful moments. When the pressure is off. That way the skills are ingrained when the pressure is on. 

Montessori friendly tips for preparing for winter with your toddler.

For me, this has been especially true teaching practical life skills -- like self dressing. The more I push when I'm under a deadline, the more resistance I face. And, the more naturally frustrated I am, just because "WE HAVE TO GO!" 

So, we've been taking a different approach with Nora and taking the pressure off by giving her time and space to practice these skills on her schedule. In particular, all the new little skills she has to learn as the weather turns into deep winter. Suddenly, it's not just a coat we need, but gloves/mittens, boots, hat and scarfs. 


For a Montessori toddler, or any toddler, the strong desire to be independent is there. By creating a simple shelf with winter themed practical life, she can practice whenever she feels like it. She can perfect the skills she needs, when she needs. No pressure, no stress, no need to worry about mistakes or if she will be warm enough. 


To create this little corner, I simply added some baskets and her REAL winter gear. I started with gloves, since that is our fall time staple, but will eventually change over to her winter mittens. I'll also add a scarf and her snowpants as we get closer to deep winter. These real objects are naturally attractive to her, but then it's also as practical as possible.

Montessori friendly tips for preparing for winter with your toddler.

I placed on a low shelf right near our entry way where we already have independent access to shoes/coats and a small dressing chair. It's exactly where she will be getting dressed and undressed all season. This is similar to what I have done with her shoes, socks and underwear in the past as well.


Then, I set her free! Practical life exploration at it's finest. I have helped if she asked, but mostly she has been content to sit and try on her own. Hopefully, this simple practical life set up will make our winter days just that much more relaxed, independent and joyful! 

What kind of practical life does your 2-year-old enjoy? How do you encourage independence, like self-dressing? 

Comments

addirigib said…
You prepare the best essay about this topic in faster way from our writing company. You can use our writing service for making your powerful projects for your college studies. Our writers teach exact information about making the good writing papers with wonderful quality. The scholarship application writing service is also maintaining good writing policy

Popular Posts

The Ultimate Montessori Toy List -- Birth to Five -- UPDATED 2017

When you are interested in Montessori, it can be difficult to know exactly what types of products you should get for your home. Or which types of "Montessori" materials are really worth the price. There are no rules about types of products can use the name Montessori which can add to the confusion. Not to mention, every toy manufacturer slaps the word "educational" on the package for good measure!

2017 UPDATE: This post has been updated to include a variety of brands and new product finds! Just a reminder that no one child will be interested in all of this or needs all of this. These toys are just here to spark ideas and give you a feeling for some Montessori-friendly options available! 


So, with this post, I'm going to try to help with this confusion! Here's a list of Montessori-friendly toys and materials for babies, toddlers and preschoolers. 


First, let's clarify that there is no such thing as a "Montessori toy." Montessori never created to…

Which Open-Ended Toys are "Worth it?"

As a Montessori parent, I try to provide a mix of materials in our home to engage my kids! That work that will spark joy, concentration, and repetition. It's not always an easy task, as Maria Montessori said, "Life is mysterious...only the choice of life can choose the work that the child truly needs. Therefore, the teacher respects this mysterious process and knows to wait with faith." So, there does sometimes feel like there is a bit of trial and error when it comes to choosing materials that your children need. 

For us, the right balance is easier to find when I spend time deeply observing my children. Watching their interests, sitting on my hands if I have to, letting them struggle a little with things, and letting them get bored. And what I have personally found is that here at home, a combination of open ended materials and more structured work have been the right balance. Open ended toys wouldn't necessarily be found in a Montessori classroom, but they are perf…

A Montessori Approach to Purging Your Toys

Becoming a Montessori family has been life changing in so many ways, most obviously with the amount and type of materials we use in our home. Once you see why having so many toys is a problem, or when you make the decision to move towards Montessori, it can be completely overwhelming. But, taking a Montessori approach to purging your toys is possible! And, it doesn't exactly mean that you have to throw away everything you have and start over with only expensive wooden toys. It will mean taking a hard look at what you have and whether it really fits with Montessori.


One note, however, Montessori is at its core about following your child's own path and respecting your child as a whole person. So, if your child has a toy, lovey, book, or whatever that your child super loves or is super attached to, but it doesn't fit Montessori ideals, don't take it away. Follow your child, that is more Montessori than whether or not you own some specific consumer product. 
How to Purge You…