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Montessori Toddler Bedroom

Here it is! Henry's long awaited "big-boy room." I've had so much fun putting together this Montessori toddler bedroom and I'm so excited to share it with everyone. 

Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom

This post contains affiliate links at no cost to you.

This could get long, so I'll break it up into parts. 

Sleeping Area

The twin-sized bed sits on the box spring on the floor. Its the perfect size for Henry to get in and out. The bedding is from Target. The wooden crates were found for around $1 each at Goodwill, then painted. The letters are from Michaels and are also hand painted. 

Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom

Play Area

This area was created by hanging two Ikea shelves at different heights. The first is hung at a height that allows Henry to stand and play. The second is a small desk and hung so he can comfortably sit. Stay tuned for more information about these awesome robot prints! The crayon sorter was made using this tutorial

Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom

Materials featured: Car racer track, color blocks, shape puzzle

Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom

Reading Area

This area was created by re-purposing a children's bookcase that has been in my family since I was a small child. With some new paint it is the perfect place to store Henry's growing library.

Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom


Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom

Play Features

The chalkboard wall was painted low to the ground so Henry could easily use it either sitting or standing with Benjamin Moore Chalkboard Paint. It still needs to be framed out so that the chalk stays off the wall. The chalk lives in a small bucket found at Target's dollar spot, and hangs on a hook next to the wall.  In addition to the chalkboard, there is the DIY Mix-and-Match wooden robots -- you can find more about those here.

Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom
Montessori toddler bedroom, a look inside a Montessori home to a 2-year-olds bedroom

See here for a tour of Henry's Montessori toddler closet! We still have a few fixes in this room, mainly the curtains need to be officially hemmed and the framing on the chalkboard needs to be installed. But, Henry is officially moved in and doing great! 

To see more behind-the-scenes pictures on how this room came together, follow me on Instagram! And make sure to check out my Montessori Home Pinterest Board for more ideas about how to introduce Montessori principals into your home.

This post contains affiliate links at no cost to you. 

Do you have a Montessori inspired space in your home? Have you noticed a difference in your kids?

If you liked this post, check out: Montessori Homeschool Classroom; Our Montessori Home

Comments

MamaViking said…
This is really awesome. I like every part of the room. It looks fun and colorful, and really well thought out. Henry is one lucky boy!
Heather said…
This is adorable, I just love it so much! I love some of the idea you came up with like the low desk and chalk bucket hook!
Kaysha said…
It turned out so well! Love how clean and colorful it is!
Beth said…
I dig that color scheme; navy and orange is so classy.
totally awesome. I have hopes of doing this one day and will defintiely use some of your ideas - for now, my henry loves his crib (he calls it "cozy") so I am just going to ride that out as long as I can!!
This room is so awesome. We are moving soon and I have been looking for ways to arrange my two boys' room. This post is very inspiring. Thank you!
Absolutely love what you've done! I love the robot bedding! Thanks for linking up.
AlissaBC said…
Love it! Very inspiring. Thanks for sharing!
Lindsay said…
This is seriously amazing!
Anonymous said…
Have you had any issues with him coloring on the wall with the crayons, and if yes, how did you deal with it? I LOVE the desk, and mine havent ever colored on the walls yet, but I know theres always a first time. Maybe I could take them out at night so they wouldnt go crazy in the early morning.
Thats exactly what I do. I don't leave them in there overnight. I trust my son and give him as much freedom as I can, but at some point I have to recognize that he is only 2 and that it would be normal to color everywhere. I choose not to deal with that mess.
Bunkin Mama said…
Beautiful! It seems so much fun! I love the organization and all the cheerful colors.
Deb Chitwood said…
You did a wonderful job with Henry's room, Nicole! I love how inviting and organized everything is! Thanks so much for linking up with Montessori Monday. In addition to featuring your post at the Living Montessori Now Facebook page, I pinned it to my Montessori-Friendly Home Board at http://pinterest.com/debchitwood/montessori-friendly-home/
Breanna said…
I LOVE this! :) It looks amazing! You did a fantastic job :) Henry looks SO happy! <3
Sierra said…
Love the room! Thank you so much for sharing. I'm curious about how you handle the chalk dust. We just recently put up a chalkboard in my 2.5 year old son's room. I totally trust him not to color on the walls but the chalk dust gets on his hands so when he loses interest in coloring and moves onto the next thing, it can create quite a hand print trail throughout the room. Do you let your son color on the chalkboard only when you are in the room or have you figured out a way to manage the mess. My son knows to wash his hands but that doesn't always mean that in his excitement he remembers to actually go do it without prompting. Would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks.
In the bucket I leave a small rag for him to wipe his hands. It has only taken a few times for him to get the hang of doing it. This way he doesn't have to leave his room, but most of the chalk dust is wiped off.
Anonymous said…
Love the room - just discovering the Montessori philosophy & applying it to my toddler's room. Wondering where you would put a change table? Would it be in the toddler's room or somewhere else? I still need one with my son as I cannot kneel (previous knee surgery on both knees means I can't kneel at all) but not sure where to position it in the room. Thanks
I left the changing table in our nursery -- which is a separate room. But Henry was potty-trained shortly after he moved into this room, so it was never a consideration of mine.
Woodly said…
Hello
I wanted to tell you about the Montessori floor bed that we produce, made in eco-friendly manner, both materials and finishes.
The project was born when my twins were six months old, and the cradle was no longer suitable.
Now it has become a product of my eco factory.
In addition, we plant a tree for every cot and bed we make.
This is our link: http://www.woodly.it/eng/baby-furniture.html
Nduoma said…
Lovely room Nicole. So simple, so perfect.
Unknown said…
How did you hang the desk? What materials were needed?
Unknown said…
How did you hang the desk? What materials were needed?
nliriano said…
Hello, I love the bedroom! I couldn´t open the link for the crayon sorter though. Could you give me some instructions?

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