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Family Tree Color Sorter

{This post was updated (Sept. 2013) with better pictures, all the content has stayed the same}

Henry loves looking at pictures and pointing out all the people he knows. He could do it over and over for hours.



I wanted to combine his love of pictures with some learning so I came up the family tree idea. (I apologize for the horrid iPad pictures - update on my camera soon) The tree itself is just a few different colored circles inside of it.


Then, I cut similar colored card stock circles, and small pictures of all our faces. I wrote the names on the back of each small circle, so that over time Hen can match names in addition to colors. Finally, I laminated them together. And, bam, a picture-color sorter.


This will be one of Henry's tot-trays for next week. But he seemed to love the sneak peak I let him have today!

If anyone is interested in the tree, the names can easily be erased, email me or leave a comment, and I'll pass it along.

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Comments

Love this, you are amazing. Could you send me to tree?
Melinda said…
What an awesome idea!! I love it and am impressed with everything you do with your tot school. Great job!
Kaysha said…
What a great idea! What baby doesn't love looking at pictures of their family?

http://memorizingthemoments.blogspot.com
Unknown said…
great idea! may I have a copy of the tree too please?

I have a question for you too. I have been a teacher and school director for 27 years and have raised 4 kids who are now in college. Last year we got a surprise with a new baby. hurray! Violet Rose is the same age as Henry and and I have been TRYING to work with her every day, but she is a whirl wind of destruction! every time a make something she destroys it. she goes from one thing to the other just throwing everything on the floor. GRRRRR. I know it is much easier to work with someone else kids than your own, but lordly this girl is pushing me! It has been 18 yrs. since my last baby, but I don't remember then being so destructive. How do you get Henry to actually do the activities????
Unknown said…
Hello,

I have the same issue with my son. Lol, I was a K teacher for 7 years so I know a bit of your frustration. Also, can I have a copy of the tree as well. Sunnyred103488@yahoo.com
Tracey Brock said…
Love this could I please have a copy of your tree to share on my educators page with a link to your blog.
traceybrockfdc@optusnet.com.au
Tracey Brock said…
Love this could I please have a copy of your tree to share on my educators page with a link to your blog.
traceybrockfdc@optusnet.com.au
Unknown said…
I love this idea! If you don't mind, could you pass along a copy of the tree? I am a genealogy blogger and I just recently started a blog about teaching young children family tree concepts and this is perfect for the youngest kids. The blog is called 'Growing Little Leaves' and can be found at: http://kowalski-bellan.weebly.com/growing-little-leaves.html I think I may turn it into a Facebook page soon too as well. I would love to feature this idea on the blog/page and link back to your blog. Thank you! ~Emily (emily_kowalski@hotmail.com
Unknown said…
This is fantastic! Could you send the tree to me?
Unknown said…
Such a wonderful idea! Thanks for sharing, it's really helpful tree!
Nik
Au Essay WRiting Place
Wow! This family tree is a very nice idea. Thanks for taking the time and sharing with us such a nice information. I appreciate your hard work here. I will definitely use your idea for creation my family tree. Hope my children will be happy making this stuff. Please keep it good posting!
Unknown said…
It is a good idea to teach our child and I also using this methods for my child education that's helps me on my child education like the myessaywritingblock.com. It's helps me to save my time by written my child academics papers.

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