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Toddle Along Tuesday: A Day in the Life

Monday, April 16, 2012. 

6:43 a.m.: Henry gets up for the day. Morgan gets him and brings him to me in bed. We nurse for 25 minutes.

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.: Once Henry is done nursing, Morgan takes him and changes his diaper. Then he is off to his exersaucer to eat a few puffs and watch TV. I quick get up, and make myself some breakfast. I eat while he is contained.

8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.: I  feed Henry breakfast. Really, I spend most of the time trying to keep the dogs out of the kitchen. Henry goes down for a nap between 90-120 minutes of his wake up time. These days its about 50/50 whether he will actually nap at this time anymore. Either way, he gets a one hour rest in his crib.
  • 8:43 a.m.: Nurse Hen; 8:50 a.m.: Lay Henry down and leave room
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.: Henry spends the entire hour in his crib wide awake. I get to work around the house. Our laundry situation is totally out of control after a week of sickness. I gather and start a couple loads, while chatting on the phone with my awesome friend Jayne.



10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.: I get Hen from his crib, he is cranky as ever. We let the dogs out and get a morning snack together. Hen eats his morning snack and plays for awhile in the living room. I try and put away some more clothes before Henry destroys all my piles.
  • 10:30  a.m.: Hen and I take a hot shower together. We do this every now and then. We're both still sick, and the steam was good for clearing our sinuses. Plus a shower always helps Hen calm down a bit when he is crabby. 
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: After our shower, we get dressed. Henry is a total crabby mess. We try and play in the living room for awhile, and switch over the laundry. It becomes clear Henry isn't going to make it to his normal lunch/nap time (normally lunch at 12pm, nap at 1pm).

  • 11:23 a.m.: Nurse Hen; 11:30 a.m.: Lay Henry down and leave. He is out within 3 minutes.
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.: Once Hen is down, I make and eat lunch while folding the laundry and watch some TV. At this point, I have folded 6 baskets of laundry.

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.: Hen got up at 1:19 p.m.. We took the dogs out, and then spent a couple minutes cuddling on the couch while he woke up. Then, it was time for lunch. While Henry ate, I unloaded the dishwasher and cleaned kitchen from lunch/breakfast.



2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.: Once lunch was over, we came back to the living room to play. I continued to put laundry away while Hen did everything in his power to get in trouble. Hen has 4 tantrums during this time.

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.: Time for Tot School! At 3:00 we went upstairs to our classroom for some focused learning. Henry alternates between coloring, his tot trays, books, and sensory bin. By 3:30 he was melting down again. So I made the decision to let him have a half hour rest.


  • 3:41  p.m.: Nurse; 3:50  p.m.: Lay Hen down, and leave room.
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.: Hen never sleeps. I have a snack, pick up the living room, change the sheets on my bed, switch over the laundry, and prep for dinner. When Hen gets up, he has a snack. We then play together in the living room. Hen has several meltdowns during this time. He was not happy today, but this behavior is pretty typical, happy or not.



5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.: We play together until 5:30. At 5:30, Hen plays on his own in kitchen/bedroom while I cook dinner. I end up just chasing him, trying to cook in between. 
  • 5:52  p.m.: Morgan comes home! Everyone is very happy to see him. He takes Hen so I can finish dinner.
6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.: We all eat dinner together. Henry watches Wheel of Fortune in his high chair.



7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.: Henry gets a half hour of quiet play before bed. No bright lights or sounds. Just Henry, Morgan, and I playing, reading, etc. At 7:30, I get Hen's room ready for bedtime while Morgan gives him a bath. Then nurse Hen and off to bed.


8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.: I hang out with Morgan for a few minutes. Then head upstairs to my office to work for my paying job.

10:00 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.: Check email, facebook, and write this post. And finally bed.

What's your day like? Head over to Growing Up Geeky and link up!





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Comments

Katie said…
Thanks for sharing :) Henry is such a cutie pie, I just love him! Sorry you're both feeling so yucky.

I love your "tot school" idea. I never would have thought of that! We don't do much focused activity at home, but I think that's mostly because they do those types of things at daycare when I'm at work.
I think we need picture evidence of this phone call with your awesome friend ;) Hen is so cute even more so with his sad face!
Lindsay said…
Ethan never sleeps, either. We're down to one nap a day, anywhere between 11:30 and 12 and it normally lasts about an hour and a half. The past week, he's been napping for a solid two hours. He's still sleeping right now -- 2 1/2 hours! Whoaaaa.

I love the tot school idea!
Unknown said…
Im so happy to see someone else is drowning in Laundry!! is there EVER an end!! sheesh!!! such a cutie!!
Kristina said…
Happy Tuesday! Visiting from Growing Up Geeky's Toddle Along Tuesday. :)

Kristina
http://www.yomichaelmichael.com
Anonymous said…
ah, life with a high needs baby. mine still naps in my arms after nursing to sleep at 18 mos. and yes, "never sleeps" describes it perfectly =/

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