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Welcome to the World of Montessori Online Conference

Welcome to the World of Montessori - join us for a free online Montessori conference January 5, 6, 7th 2018!

Join us for a FREE online Montessori Conference January 5, 6, and 7th 2018! 


Welcome to the World of Montessori! There is so much to discover when you are first learning about Montessori that it can seem completely overwhelming. In Montessori 101, the Facebook group that I co-admin with some amazing Montessorians, we strive to help everyone understand the beauty of the Montessori method, no matter where they are in their journey. 

Still, it can be hard to really learn Montessori basics in such a dynamic, fast paced environment. Also, the internet is so overrun with Montessori and Montessori inspired ideas that it can be difficult to get to the bottom of what Montessori really is all about.

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On January 5th we will open up our first ever FREE Montessori conference. For 3 days we will talk  Montessori basics including about the history of Montessori, how Montessori works in schools and how Montessori looks and feels at home. The conference will take place in a closed Facebook group, include live videos and engaging discussions, and some extra resources for you to explore on your own! 

Come join us and discover everything Montessori has to offer! 

About Your Hosts 

Aubrey Hargis

Aubrey Hargis is the founder and executive director of The Child Development Institute of the Redwoods and the creator of the Montessori 101 group on Facebook. Through CDIR, she offers coaching and consultations to parents and teachers who are looking for gentle parenting techniques and effective teaching strategies. As an educator and child development researcher, she has taught children aged from toddlers through elementary school in both the public and private school sector and holds both an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction and an American Montessori Society certificate in Lower Elementary. The coastal cliffs and the redwood trails in the San Francisco Bay area beckon her almost every weekend for another family adventure

Amy Dorsch 

Amy Dorsch is the creator and writer behind MontessoriChildhood.com. She has written personally for years at Midwest Montessori on Tumblr as well as Instagram, sharing her own family’s Montessori journey. Now with a degree in Early Childhood and Elementary education and Montessori primary teacher certification, she hopes to share her passion for Montessori with parents online through her educational website, online parenting courses, and one-on-one parent consulting. Amy is currently preparing to enter the world of teaching, as well as graduate studies in Montessori education. Amy’s goal online is to help parents give their children the gift of a Montessori childhood - a gift for life.

Nicole Kavanaugh

Nicole is the writer and creator of The Kavanaugh Report, which documents her family's Montessori home, and educates parents on how to incorporate Montessori into their lives. Nicole holds a B.A. in History and a Juris Doctor (J.D.). She has been studying Montessori philosophy for the past six years. As an admin of Montessori 101, Nicole strives to help parents incorporate Montessori at home, no matter where they are in their Montessori journey. Nicole lives in Minnesota with her husband, three children, and two dogs.

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The Ultimate Montessori Toy List -- Birth to Five -- UPDATED 2019

When you are interested in Montessori, it can be difficult to know exactly what types of products you should get for your home. Or which types of "Montessori" materials are really worth the price. There are no rules about types of products can use the name Montessori which can add to the confusion. Not to mention, every toy manufacturer slaps the word "educational" on the package for good measure!

2019 UPDATE: This post has been updated to include a variety of brands and new product finds! Just a reminder that no one child will be interested in all of this or needs all of this. These toys are just here to spark ideas and give you a feeling for some Montessori-friendly options available! 


So, with this post, I'm going to try to help with this confusion! Here's a list of Montessori-friendly toys and materials for babies, toddlers and preschoolers. 


First, let's clarify that there is no such thing as a "Montessori toy." Montessori never created to…

Sensitive Periods from Birth to 6 - A Chart and Guide

Dr. Maria Montessori spent her life observing, studying, and writing about children. During her lifetime of work she discovered that young children move through a series of special times when they are particularly attracted to specific developmental needs and interests. She called these times, sensitive periods. During the sensitive period, children learn skills related to the sensitive period with ease. They don't tire of that work, but seek it, crave it and need it. When the sensitive period passes, this intense desire is gone, never to return. 

That doesn't mean the skill is lost forever once the sensitive period is over. Instead, it just means that it will take a more conscious effort to learn. As Dr. Montessori explains, 
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"A child learns to adjust himself and make acquisitions in his sensitive periods. These are like a beam that lights interiorly a battery that furnishes energy. It is this sensibility which enables a…

Working from Home with Kids - A Montessori Schedule

One part of my life that I haven't talked a ton about here on The Kavanaugh Report is how I'm a work-from-home parent. Eight years ago I started to work at home while parenting full time. For the first several years, I worked as a legal writer while maintaining this space on the side. When Gus was born, I moved into working on sharing our Montessori life full time. It has blossomed into a full time career sharing content here, teaching courses, and now the podcast! Through it all, my kids have been home with me. 
This all seems more relevant to so many of us now that Covid-19 has closed schools and forced parents to stay at home and work while caring for children. I'm not going to lie - it's tough. It's hard to balance work and kids, especially when children are used to a completely different routine. But, it's not impossible! And, it can even be enjoyable. 

As I talk about in my podcast Shelf Help, we block our days into 3 hours groups. It helps me remain fle…