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Thick and Thin Sensory Bottles for Toddlers

Development of the senses is an important part of Montessori learning. Through a variety of sensorial work, children in a Montessori classroom are given the incredible opportunity to refine their senses. The sensorial work is pure genius and, I think, is really lacking in other educational environments. Whether its the pink tower, pressure cylinders or tasting work, children are given the opportunity to isolate and focus on their senses. They are given the space to figure out how the natural world works in relation to their body -- seriously incredible stuff.  


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I'm a big believer that this wonder and amazement does not need to be left only to the classroom. And, therefore, sensory play is a big part of our lives -- starting when my children are young. I'm always looking for interesting and engaging ways to incorporate new sensory play into our routine. Even for infants and toddlers, these experiences can be very rewarding. 

These DIY sensory bottles help to explore the concepts of thick and thin with toddlers.
Sensory bottles are one way that I like to engage a certain part of their senses. They are simple, they're easy, they're cheap! And, for toddlers, they are safe. Recently, I created these fun thick and thin sensory bottles for Nora. They help to work on visual discrimination skills while having fun! 


To make these sensory bottles, I just filled my favorite bottles with gems and pony beads. Then, I filled the one with pony beads up with water and the one with gems up with clear liquid soap. Finally, some hot glue to seal the caps and these were done! 


These have been on our shelves for a few weeks now and Henry and Nora both really seem to enjoy them. Nora (2) seems to really enjoy the challenge of shaking the thick bottle to see if she can get the gems to move around. While, Henry (5) was determined to shake the thin beads hard enough to get them to stay suspended in the water. I wasn't expecting Henry to really enjoy these, but I was pleasantly surprised that he has shown interest. It has led to interesting conversations and questions about the differences and why that might be. 


Plus, it's been down right fun! Do your kids enjoy sensory play? What are some Montessori inspired ways you incorporate sensory learning and play into your home? 

12 Months of Montessori

This post was brought to you as part of the 12 Months of Montessori series! This month's theme is sensorial! For other great Montessori and Montessori inspired posts, don't miss these great blogs! 

Pink Tower Power | Grace and Green Pastures
DIY Texture Pattern Sticks | Christian Montessori Network

Comments

Yuliya Fruman said…
What a great way to explore the senses! I love that you created sensory bottles for exploring thickness- what a unique and fun idea :)
Kimberly Huff said…
I always love your sensory bottles so much!
I missed out of these bottles from Hobby Lobby when I visited the US. I love all your bottled collections! Hope I can find some alternative. Thank you for this!
BlogTanya WS said…
What a great post! I love DIY Montessori ideas!
Bess Wuertz said…
This is a lovely idea. I adore the bottles you are using!
These are brilliant! I need to copy this activity. I really love it. The little sensory bottles are awesome!

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